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Sir Israel Gollancz Prize

The Sir Israel Gollancz Prize, worth £400, is awarded biennially for work connected with Anglo-Saxon, Early English Language and Literature, English Philology, or the History of English Language. The prize, together with a lecture, was established through a bequest from Mrs Frida Mond in 1924. It was her intention to associate both prize and lecture with Sir Israel Gollancz, the first Secretary of the British Academy, ‘in token of a highly valued old friendship and his effort to further these studies’. During Sir Israel’s lifetime, at his own request, the award was known as the Biennial Prize for English Literature, but, after his death in 1930, it became the Sir Israel Gollancz Prize. The Prize was first awarded in 1925.

Specification

Eligible nominations can be for any published work of sufficient value on subjects connected with Anglo-Saxon, Early English Language and Literature, English Philology, or the History of English Language; or for original investigations connected with the history of English Literature or the works of English writers, with preference for the earlier period. 

Nominations may only be made by Fellows of the British Academy.

Nominating body: Section H8.

This prize will next be awarded in 2017. 


Previous Winners


2015  Professor Ralph Hanna, University of Oxford

2013  Professor Leslie Lockett, Ohio State University

2011  Professor Jill Mann FBA, Honorary Fellow of St Anne’s College, Oxford

2009  Professor Michael Lapidge FBA, Emeritus Fellow, Clare College, Cambridge

2007  Professor James Simpson

2005  Professor Patrick P O'Neill

2003  Professor Robert Lewis

2001  Professor Malcolm Godden and the late Professor Peter Clemoes

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