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Do we need robot law?


This event took place at the Royal Society on 31 January 2017 and is part of the British Academy's season on 
Robotics, AI and Society

Advances in AI have enabled a range of developments in robotics, from driverless vehicles to unmanned military machines. These advances raise questions about autonomy and accountability - what happens if a faithful servant disobeys an action, and who is to blame if things go wrong? Can our current governance mechanisms lessen the

Advances in AI have enabled a range of developments in robotics, from driverless vehicles to unmanned military machines. These advances raise questions about autonomy and accountability - what happens if a faithful servant disobeys an action, and who is to blame if things go wrong? Can our current governance mechanisms lessen these risks and empower us to adopt new technologies? Or do we need new laws and guidelines?

Speakers:
Professor Susanne Beck, Professor for Criminal Law and Law Philosophy, University Hannover 
Roger Bickerstaff, Partner, Bird & Bird
Professor Patrick Haggard FBA, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London
Professor Noel Sharkey, Emeritus Professor of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, University of Sheffield

Chair:
Dr Hannah Devlin, Science Correspondent, Guardian

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