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British Academy announces five new research projects

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The British Academy has announced the extension of the Academy Research Project portfolio to include support for five research projects in the social sciences. The five new projects (selected from 22 proposals submitted) have been recognised for the excellence of their scholarship, and the promise and exciting nature of their programmes. The projects will be funded by the British Academy for five years, with the potential to renew funding thereafter.

The five projects which have been awarded funding include: an online resource for data on religion in Britain, peer-reviewed publications on human rights, an exploration of difficulties in language processing, a longitudinal household survey and the digitisation of key documents in the debate about the future of the voluntary social services.

The winning projects are below, further information is available online.

  • Digitising the Mixed Economy of Welfare in Britain

This collaborative, interdisciplinary project will make key documents available that will enhance understanding of the role of voluntary organisations in our mixed economy of welfare.

Understanding Society is a household panel survey which follows individuals over time to create a core research resource to address key questions of central relevance to UK society.

Major peer-reviewed publications using The Oxford Human Rights Hub (ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk), which provides a free online forum, in which academics, policy makers and practitioners can share cutting edge analyses of developments in human rights law across the world.

  • DALIP: Database of Acquired Language Impairment Profiles

This project aims to explore the nature and impact of language processing difficulties in adults with neurological impairments.

The British Religion in Numbers (BRIN) project is a free online centre for British data on religion, providing empirical evidence to underpin research and debate about the key issues and trends affecting religion in Britain, past and present.

 

Photocredit: United Nations Photo via Flickr, from The Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog

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